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Documentation Requirements

The Student Accessibility Services Office (SAS) views disabilities as an integral part of the rich diversity of Pasco-Hernando State College (PHSC). For that reason, we make a collaborative effort with students, staff and faculty to create an inclusive, educational environment for all students.

First-year and transfer students may initiate the accommodation process after applying to PHSC. Current students may apply at any time, however, accommodations are not retroactive. Please visit the Student Accessibility Services “Accommodation Process” for more information.

The same documentation guidelines are used and required at each PHSC campus. Please use the contact information below to contact an Student Accessibility Services staff representative most convenient to you:

Disability Documentation Guidelines

In order to provide reasonable, effective and appropriate academic accommodations to students at Pasco-Hernando State College who have disabilities, Student Accessibility Services requires students to provide current, relevant and comprehensive medical documentation of the disability and the disability’s impact on the student’s participation in a course, program, or activity.

The student will also have the opportunity to discuss the impact of the disability on his/her academic performance, as well as discuss what accommodation(s) have worked and what has not been effective during his/her appointment.

Therefore, the documentation provided by the student must include the following information:

Documentation from Professionals

  • Documentation reflects a specific diagnosis or condition and the current functional limitations or academic barriers presented by the disability; i.e., how does the disability create a barrier for the student academically?
  • Include a DSM-V or ICD-10 code where appropriate. If medications are taken, identify the side effects that impact academic performance.
  • Typed letters on official letterhead, psycho-educational evaluation reports (with scores), or neuro-psychological evaluation reports (with scores) are preferred. Letters must be signed by an evaluator qualified to make the diagnosis, and include information about license or certification, background and area of specialization.
  • Documentation must be dated and signed by the physician or evaluator and be current.
  • Please bring the appropriate documentation to the appointment with the Student Accessibility Services staff member, including the report and/or diagnostic evaluation of disability and any related documentation.

Incomplete or Insufficient Documentation of Disability

  • Hand written notes on prescription (Rx) pads are not sufficient.
  • Individualized Educational Plans (IEP) and 504 Plans, although providing historical evidence of services and accommodations, are generally not considered sufficient documentation, unless they contain required information. However, these documents may be used as a supplement to more current documentation.
  • Documentation written by family members is not sufficient.

Guidelines for Documenting Disability by Category

Attention Deficit/Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD)

  • Summary of current assessment procedures and evaluation instruments used to determine the diagnosis. A summary from a physician who has been treating the student for ADHD is also acceptable.
  • Information regarding medications prescribed and possible side effects that may impact academic performance.
  • Information regarding functional limitations or barriers connected to the ADHD in the academic environment is crucial; i.e. “How does ADHD impair the student’s ability to learn?”
  • Recommended reasonable accommodations that will provide effective access to the student’s academic program.

Autism Spectrum Disorder

  • Summary of current assessment procedures and evaluation instruments used to determine the diagnosis. A summary from a professional practitioner who has been treating the student is also acceptable.
  • Information regarding medications prescribed and possible side effects that may impact academic performance.
  • Information regarding functional limitations or barriers connected to Autism Spectrum Disorder in the academic environment is crucial; i.e. “How does the developmental disability or Autism Spectrum disorder impair the student’s ability to learn?”
  • Recommended reasonable accommodations that will provide effective access to the student’s academic program.

Blind or Low Vision

  • Letter or report from an ophthalmologist or optometrist.
  • Letter or documentation from an agency specializing is working with and assisting individual who are blind or have low vision, i.e. Division of Blind Services. Information regarding functional limitations or barriers connected to the student’s vision loss in the academic environment is crucial; i.e. “How does vision loss or blindness impair the student’s ability to learn?”
  • Recommended reasonable accommodations that will provide effective access to the student’s academic program.
  • A visual impairment is defined by the State of Florida as disorders in the structure and function of the eye as manifested by at least one of the following: visual acuity of 20/70 or less in the better eye after the best possible correction, a peripheral field so constricted that it affects one’s ability to function in an educational setting, or a progressive loss of vision which may affect one’s ability to function in an educational setting. Examples include, but are not limited to, cataracts, glaucoma, nystagmus, retinal detachment, retinitis pigmentosa, and strabismus.

Deaf or Hard of Hearing

  • Letter or report from an audiologist or otolaryngologist.
  • Information regarding functional limitations or barriers connected to the student’s hearing loss in the academic environment is crucial; i.e. “How does the deafness or loss of hearing impair the student’s ability to learn?”
  • Recommended reasonable accommodations that will provide effective access to the student’s academic program (sign language interpreter, real time captioning, note takers, etc.).
  • A hearing loss is defined by the State of Florida as a loss of thirty (30) decibels or greater, pure tone average of 500, 1000, and 4000 (Hz), unaided, in the better ear. Examples include, but are not limited to, conductive hearing impairment or deafness, sensorineural hearing impairment or deafness, and high or low tone hearing loss or deafness, and acoustic trauma hearing loss or deafness.

Orthopedic

  • Letter from a physician qualified to diagnose and treat the condition.
  • Identifying the specific orthopedic condition is preferred.
  • Information about side effects of medications prescribed for treatment.
  • Information regarding functional limitations or barriers connected to the student’s medical disability in the academic environment is crucial; i.e. “How does the disability impair the student’s ability to learn?”
  • Recommended reasonable accommodations that will provide effective access to the student’s academic program.

Other Health Disabilities

  • Letter from a physician qualified to diagnose and treat the condition.
  • Identifying the specific medical condition is preferred.
  • Information about side effects of medications prescribed for the treatment.
  • Information regarding functional limitations or barriers connected to the student’s medical disability in the academic environment is crucial; i.e. “How does the disability impair the student’s ability to learn?”
  • Recommended reasonable accommodations that will provide effective access to the student’s academic program.

Psychological/Emotional/Behavioral

  • Letter from a physician, psychologist, psychiatrist, licensed social worker, or licensed mental health counselor, qualified to diagnose and treat the condition.
  • Identifying the specific psychological/emotional/behavioral disability.
  • Information about side effects of medications prescribed for treatment.
  • Information regarding functional limitations or barriers connected to the student’s psychological/emotional/behavioral disability in the academic environment is crucial; i.e. “How does the disability impair the student’s ability to learn?”
  • Recommended reasonable accommodations that will provide effective access to the student’s academic program.

Specific Learning Disability/Intellectual Disability

  • Psycho-educational evaluation or neuro-psychological evaluation conducted by a licensed psychologist or certified school psychologist.
  • Evaluations based on adult norms are preferred.
  • If evaluations are more than 3 years old or based on children’s norms, an addendum may be requested. This to confirm academic barriers are still present and/or if additional academic barriers are presented.
  • IQ evaluation narrative, scores, and sub-test scores are explained in determining reasonable accommodations.
  • Information regarding functional limitations or barriers connected to the student’s learning disability in the academic environment is crucial; i.e. “How does the specific learning disability impair the student’s ability to learn?”
  • Recommended reasonable accommodations that will provide effective access to the student’s academic program.

*Recommended IQ evaluation:

  • Cognitive processing narrative, scores, and sub-test scores are required in determining reasonable accommodations for Specific Learning Disability.
  • Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (most recent version)
  • Woodcock-Johnson Test of Cognitive Abilities (most recent version)

*Recommended Test for Achievement:

  • Academic Achievement evaluation narrative, scores, and sub-test scores are required in determining reasonable accommodations for Specific Learning Disability.
  • Wechsler Individual Achievement Test (most recent version)
  • Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Achievement (most recent version)

*Brief screening measurements are not sufficient.

Speech/Language

  • Letter from a physician or practitioner qualified to diagnose and treat the disorder.
  • Identifying the specific speech/language disorder is required.
  • Information regarding functional limitations or barriers connected to the student’s speech/language disability in the academic environment is crucial; i.e. “How does the disability impair the student’s ability to learn?”
  • Recommended reasonable accommodations that will provide effective access to the student’s academic program.

Traumatic Brain Injury

  • Psycho-educational evaluation or neuro-psychological evaluation is required in determining reasonable accommodations.
  • IQ evaluation narrative, scores, and sub-test scores are helpful in determining reasonable accommodations.
  • Academic Achievement evaluation narrative, scores, and sub-test scores are helpful in determining reasonable accommodations.
  • Cognitive Processing narrative, scores, and sub-test scores are helpful in determining reasonable accommodations.
  • Evaluations based on adult norms are preferred.
  • If the above evaluations are not available, a letter from a physician or practitioner qualified to diagnose and treat a TBI.
  • Information regarding functional limitations or barriers connected to the student’s TBI in the academic environment is crucial; i.e. “How does the TBI impair the student’s ability to learn?”
  • Recommended reasonable accommodations that will provide effective access to the student’s academic program.